Everyone has experienced, been involved and or witnessed road rage. Road rage/aggressive driving is a factor in 54% of all fatal motor vehicle crashes, according to the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety

What is Road Rage?

Road rage occurs when a driver experiences extreme aggression or anger intending to create or cause physical harm. The term dates back to the 1990s when media dubbed a new term for the growing trend of aggressive driving cases across the nation. Legislators have made it a criminal offense to express the severirty of road rage, while aggresive driving remains a traffic violation in most areas.

What should you do when you experience another driver exhibiting road rage?

Stay away! Some drivers may go as far as brake checking or even getting out of their vehicle in the middle of traffic. It is best that if you aren't involved to stay back, last thing you want is your vehicle getting damaged, and or bodly injury. If you are the victim of road rage, call 911 immediatley and try not to esculate the situtaion. Stay far away from the aggressor.

Aggressive Driving vs. Road Rage

Aggresive DrivingRoad Rage
Basic definitionDeliberate, unsafe driving behavior that poses a risk to property or anotherExtreme deliberate, unsafe driving that poses an immediate and significant risk to property or another
Common behaviorsTailgating
Speeding when in heavy traffic
Cutting off another driver
Running red lights
Weaving in and out of traffic
Frequently changing lanes
Rude or inflammatory gestures
Profanity
Hitting, bumping, sideswiping or ramming another vehicle
Use of headlights or brakes to initimidate or harass other drivers
Forcing another car off the road

How common is road rage?

In a survey the NHTSA asked motorists about feelings of safety on U.S. roads. About 65% said their family feels thereatened by unsafe driving, while three-quarters of respondents urged for something to be done.

The AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety did a deep dive into the behaviors seen on U.S. roads.

  • Almost 80% of all drivers affirmed that while driving, they had experienced extereme anger, aggression, or road rage within the last month.
  • About 78% of drivers admit to engaging in aggressive behavior themselves.
  • About half of drivers admit honking, yelling or purposely tailgating another vehicle as the most common expressions of annoyance and anger.

Likelihood of Aggresive Driving Among U.S. Drivers (AAA, 2019)

BehaviorPercentage of driversTotal number of drivers
Aggressively switching lanes while close to another vehicle26%57 million
Honking or making rude gestures32%71 million
Driving 15 mph or more over the highway speed limit48%106 million
Running a red light31%68 million
Cutting in front of another vehicle22%49 million
Speeding to prevent another vehicle from passing you25%55 million
Tailgating to prevent another vehicle from merging in front of you34%75 million
Rushing to merge into traffic in front of another vehicle28%62 million